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1234

[ 🎶 Thinking Cap ] This post is framed around results of cypher-based queries for the number 1234 against my custom lexicon files built up over a year of phrase inputs (mostly gleaned from newspaper headlines and their 'quoted phrases', or stream of conciousness inspired by them). There are not very many, but the few there are appear to be instructive. I have used some repetition to aid those with trouble remembering numbers. Perhaps NSFW. (For the confused: see here, here and here)
If you are brand new to this collection of scrolls, I recommend reading (as much as you can of) this before returning here, which will help to justify my particular focus below (the belt).
Did you gnow A=1?
There are 26 letters in the English-Latin Alphabet.
The basic alphabetic gematria code acknowledges that A=1, B=2, C=3, ..., Z=26 (ie. ordinal gematria).
In this basic alphabetic cypher (which is implied if I do not specify):
If you flip the numeric ordering about (ie. look in the mirror: treat 'Z' as 1, down to 'A' as 26), then...
This ("The ABC") is the name of the earliest alphabet primer textbooks for kids.
The first church primers paralleled the introduction of school textbooks known as “the ABC”
The Alphabet is a vessel for messages:
If, instead of the basic alphabetic ordinal cyphers above, we use another cypher some call Agrippa's Key, and some call the 'jewish cipher', which is based on the ancient Hebrew and Greek gematria charts, and maps that scheme to the Latin Alphabet, we can ask a catch-phrase question (written more formally than usual)
What's in a name?
Indeed:
Here we move beyond the three steps of ABC and arrive at the Door of Dalet. Behind it, if we have the write keys, we might discover...
The results of...
Itself the result of...
... of the Masters of the Ages.
Or not.
Many folks shun numbers:
  • "Obnoxious" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... ("number" = 73 = "crazy" ... but "perfect" = "count" = 73)
  • "The Great Learning" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... ( "Great Knowledge" = 449 primes (*) )
  • ... ( .. ... "Mental Contact" = 449 primes )
  • ... ( .. .. "Population" = 449 primes )
  • "Silence is Golden" = 449 primes (ie. Hush in the Library)
  • "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "Forbidden Word" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... .. .. ( "Silence is Golden" = 449 primes )
  • "My Call of Duty" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • .. ... .. "What is in a name?" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • "Silent Warrior" = 1234 english-extended
  • ... ( "Rain" = 322 trigonal ) ( "Number" = 73 alphabetic; "Jake" = "Bard" = 73 primes )
  • ... ( .. "Counting" = 322 trigonal ) ( "Count" = 73 = "Perfect" = "Number" )
  • ... ( .. "To Know" = 322 trigonal ) ( "The Mind" = 73 = "Count" = "Number" )
  • ... ( .. "The Proof" = 322 trigonal )
  • ... ( .. .. "Final Proof" = 322 jewish-latin-agrippa )
Genesis 3:22 (KJV Bible)
And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:
  • "To Know" = 322 primes
  • "A Magic Number" = 322 primes
  • .. .. ... "Magician" = 322 trigonal
Make it ...
  • "Rain" = 322 trigonal
... for the ...
  • "Girl" = 322 trigonal
Thor and Jane meet again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0HzpZAgAwY
  • "Full Name" = 322 jewish-latin-agrippa (ie. Count it! ... but you are fool to reveal it)
  • ... .. .. ( "What is in a name?" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa )
  • .. .. ... ( ... https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/True_name )
  • . .. ... "Counting" = 322 primes
  • ... .. "Count" = 393 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • .. . "Accurate" = 393 primes
  • . "Accountancy" = 393 primes
  • "Counting" = 322 primes
  • "Full Name" = 322 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... ( "A Magic Number" = 322 primes )
  • "What is in a name?" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... .. .. "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal
The Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge...
  • "Great Knowledge" = 449 primes
  • "Sex Education" = 449 primes
  • ... ( building "Population" = 449 primes )
...And they knew they were naked (ie. eyes opened):
  • "Shame On You" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... "The First Day" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... .. .. "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal
  • "Sex Education" = 1337 english-extended (ie. Elite codes)
  • "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... .. .. "The Great Learning" = 1234 trigonal
  • .. .. ... "A Great Work" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "Speak Loud and Clear" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... .. "Water out!" = 1234 trigonal (ie. 'The Number' ~= 'Pregnant' ~= 'A Baby')
  • ... .. .. "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal (ie. spell-casting -> spillage -> spoil it)
Serpents, and Tower of Babylon:
  • "What is in a name?" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "The Unpatchable Code" = 1234 trigonal (DNA code; written language, (relatively) hard to change)
  • ... .. .. "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal
  • .. .. ... "The One Source" = 1234 trigonal
  • .. .. ... .. "The Duration of One Year" = 1234 jewish-latin-agripa
  • ... .. .. ... .. "The Source" = 365 primes (ie. days in a year, solar orbit)
ie. Matrix Code - Mother Code Pregnancy Procedure and Cascading Responsibility.
  • "My little Pony" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
If you're lucky:
  • "Birth of Twins" = 1234 english-extended
ie. quantum-entanglement: you cannot give birth to your first alphabetic Son, a strong boy named Aleph, and deny he is '1'. You cannot have your second child, a beautiful maiden, Beth, and deny she is '2'.
Animals on the ark 2 by 2. You cannot order the alphabet, and deny the letters have ordinal indexes (ie. numbers associated with them - significant others)
  • "Boat" = 123 primes
To travel down...
  • "Denial" = 123 primes ...is as easy as ABC.
Again, many folks shun numbers:
Obstetrics is the field of study concentrated on pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. As a medical specialty, obstetrics is combined with gynaecology under the discipline known as obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) which is a surgical field.
  • "Obnoxious" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... "The Number" = 333 primes
  • ... "Unspeakable" = 333 primes
  • ... "The Unspeakable Number" = 666 primes
  • .
  • "Counting" = 322 primes
  • "Magician" = 322 trigonal
  • ... "Magician" = 156 primes
  • ... "Apple" = 156 primes
  • ... ( the 156th prime number is 911 )
  • ... ( ... "Divine Feminine" = 911 jewish-latin-agrippa )
  • ... ( ... "She is a Beauty" = 911 jewish-latin-agrippa )
  • ... ( ... "Sexy Girl" = 911 jewish-latin-agrippa )
  • ... ( "The Last Proof of Life After Death" = 911 primes )
I have a spell-matching feature that can cross-match multiple cypher results and return the 'closest frequency matches' of all the spells I've ever entered into my gematria tools. At the time of writing the lexicon file is half a megabyte in size (plain text) and contains 37,694 words and phrases.
When I ask for the spellings that most closely match: "live forever", I get the following three results as top matches:
  • 'white liquid', 'into the girl', and 'the dilution' (with 8+ cypher matches)
There are a lot of flowery symbolic or metaphorical phrases that it could have returned, but it seems the Heptapods are rather blunt.
Again:
  • "Divine Feminine" = 911 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... .. "Sexy Girl" = 911 jewish-latin-agrippa
From...
Revelation 9:11 King James Version (KJV):
And they had a king [41] over them, which is the angel of the bottomless pit, whose name in the Hebrew tongue is Abaddon [41] , but in the Greek tongue hath his name Apollyon.
This is perhaps a dual - the Abaddon is both Father Beast (and Lord of the Harem, perhaps, given the plural 'them') and the Beastly Progeny (ie. King and Prince):
  • "Pregnant" = 333 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • "The Temple" = 333 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "A Baby" = 333 trigonal
The angelic little baby, retrieved from the bottomless pit, is the apple of mommy and daddy's eyes (even though it is very naughty, ruling over their lives for many years after his or her noxious retrieval from the Underworld).
"I wonder why?" = 474 primes ( "Accountancy" = 393 primes )
  • "Numerology" = 474 primes
  • "Great Pattern" = 474 primes
  • "Object of Lust" = 474 primes ( "Deny Nature" = 419 primes )
  • "The Devil, Woman" = 474 primes (ie. Beauty and the Beast)
  • .
  • ... "The Number" = 333 primes
  • ... .. .. "A Baby" = 333 trigonal
  • "The Great Emergence" = 474 primes
  • "Population" = 449 primes
  • ... "Sex Education" = 449 primes
  • .. .. .. "Surveillance" = 449 primes
  • ("A Pornographic" = 616 englist-extended [ie. "Number" = 616 trigonal ] )
  • ("Pornographica" = 616 eng-ext [ie. "Perfect Number" = 616 jewish-latin-agrippa ] )
  • ... ("The Law" = 616 trigonal )
  • ... ("Garden of Eden" = 616 trigonal )
  • .
  • "To Know" = 322 primes
You cannot unsee it:
  • "Girl" = 322 trigonal <---- pornographic numeric hieroglyph
To each there own:
  • "Tradition" = 393 jewish-latin-agripa
  • "The Perfect Woman" = 1,393 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • "Tradition" = 393 jewish-latin-agripa
  • ... "Count" = 393 jewish-latin-agripa
  • .. .. ... "Accountancy" = 393 primes
Occult Alphabet = English Alphabet = Statistics
  • "Figures Reveal..." = 1234 trigonal
  • .... "Liberal Party" = 1234 trigonal
  • Q: .. "What Rules?" = 1234 english-extendedd
  • A: .. "Just Sign Here"* = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
The closest multi-cypher spectrum match against dictionary files (as described here), to the spell "One Thing" is:
  • "enduring" (with 9+ matches)
  • "Tradition" = 393 jewish-latin-agripa
  • ... "Survive" = 393 primes
  • ... .. .."Greyhound race" = 1234 trigonal
  • .. .. ... ... "The Rat Race" = 314 primes (ie. pi; commute in circles)
  • "Great Place" = 1234 square
Viva Las Vegas (ie. V.L.V ):
777 (ie. to win at slots):
  • "A Triple-Seven" = 1234 trigonal | 2,322 squares
The Boeing 777 is a premiere passenger aircraft.
The Boeing 787 is called the Dreamliner (ie "The Call" = 787 squares ... of Morpheus)
The Boeing 747 is Old Faithful, the Jumbo Jet of Time
Air Force One is a 747
  • "Air Force" = 223 primes
  • "Winds" = 223 primes
  • "Goddess" = 223 primes
  • ... "The Law" = 223 primes
  • ... "Air Force" = 223 primes
  • "Winds" = 223 primes
  • .
  • "The Law" = "Goddess" = 223 primes
She steps on "The Scale" = 223 primes ...
...and hopes she is ...
  • "Weightless" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
From an old Alphabet Primer:
... He that ne'er learns his ABC,
... For ever will a Blockhead be.
... But he that learns these Letters fair,
... Shall have a Coach to take the Air.
Are you ready, Icarus?
  • "This is the deal" = 139 = "Occult Alphabet"
  • ... "Competition" = 139 = "Pyramid scheme" = "Ancient Egypt"
Mirror Mirror, upon the wall, who is the Pharaoh over all?
Extra credit:
Read about the taming of Enkidu, in the myth of Gilgamesh:
  • "The Spells of Eden" = 1234 trigonal
  • "Great Knowledge" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "Great Knowledge" = 449 primes
  • ... "Sex Education" = 449 primes | 1337 english-extended
  • ... .. .. "Prostitute" = 1234 english-extended
  • .. .. ... .. "Carnival Row" = 1234 english-extended
  • ... .. .. "Prostitute" = 1234 english-extended
  • .. .. ... ... "Presidential Golf Course" = 1234 english-extended
  • "One, Two, Three, and Four" = 227 basic alphabetic (the 'and' was for ... metrical reasons.)
  • ... ( "The Emergence" = 722 trigonal ... ie. pi and reverse pi; circles)
Q: ?
  • "A: The Emergence" = 314 primes (ie. classic Amorican pi)
  • "A: The Emergence" = 1337 squares (ie. "sex education" = 1337 english-extended)
  • "The Alphabetical Epidemic" = 1234 trigonal
  • ... "Not entirely true(?)" = 1234 jewish-latin-agrippa
Enregisterment is often partially, rather than completely, true, sort of like an accent viewed through a funhouse mirror.
I was triggered to made this post due to various recent media 'events', this 'crazy' 'news item' the final straw that broke the gimel's black (I link to old reddit theme because it is objectively better ):
Also, see recent threads:
Relevant numbers & links:
Also, perhaps relevant pings:
Disclaimer:
You might have noticed the game I've long played with the dots used for spacing and indenting lists of spells. They usually follow the pattern of:
  • ... (ie. 3, trinity, the Beatrice of the Matrix Code)
  • ... .. (ie. 32, life, Eve)
  • ... ... (ie. 33, magic, name, a life)
  • . .. ... (ie. 123, alphabetic codes, the ABC, initation)
  • ... .. . (ie. 321, countdown to church society)
  • ... .. .. (ie. 322, to know, the proof is counting)
  • .. .. ... (ie. 223, the law, chapter 1, the scale, goddess, Lucifer, the moon)
  • .. ... .. (ie. 232, scary, number, Satan)
  • ... .. ... (ie. 323, Lucifer, 1 Goddess)
  • ... .. .. ... (ie. 3223, the upward spiral, ascending the tower of babylon)
Sometimes the layout is thematically tied to the associated text.
  • . "Scary" = 232 primes
  • .. "Number" = 232 primes
  • ... "Tell All" = 232 primes
Wiki Index: https://old.reddit.com/GeometersOfHistory/wiki/index
.
EDIT:
Chinese researcher accused of trying to smuggle vials of ‘biological material’ out of US hidden in a sock
Sweeping ban on semiautomatic weapons takes effect in New Zealand
  • "The Semiautomatic Rifle" = 232 basic alphabetic
  • ... "Bullet" = 232 primes
  • ... "Scary" = 232 primes
  • ... .. .. "Number" = 232 primes
  • ... "Scary" = 232 primes
  • ... .. .. "Satan" = 232 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • .
  • "Semiautomatic Rifles" = 1776 trigonal
  • .
  • "The Semiautomatic Rifle" = 232 basic alphabetic
  • ... "Bullet" = 232 primes
  • ... "Number" = 232 primes
Bullet News Bulletsin Bullet points Bullet Bull ET Extraterrestrial Bull Bull God
  • "The Bull God" = 322 primes
.
EDIT: - moments later - :
https://old.reddit.com/occult/comments/eee131/does_anyone_know_what_this_symbol_represents_its/
Does anyone know what this symbol represents, it's familiar to me and puts of a very unique energy and I cannot place it
  • "unique energy" = 322 baconis | 522 primes ("the prime number" = 522 primes)
  • "(a) very unique energy" = 232 basic alphabetic | 2,247 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... "very unique energy" = 2023 trigonal (ie. 223 with zephyr)
  • "the very unique energy" = 264 basic alphabetic ("Source" = 264 primes)
The golden ratio is 1.61(8...)
  • ... "unique energy" = 161 basic alphabetic
  • ... "unique energy" = 1601 english-extended
  • ... "unique energy" = 1061 jewish-latin-agrippa
  • ... .. "energizer" = 1061 english-extended
  • ... .. .. "unique energy" = 161 basic alphabetic | 322 baconis
  • .. .. ... "undercurrent" = 161 basic alphabetic | 322 baconis
  • .. .. ... "song of creation" = 161 basic alphabetic | 322 baconis
https://old.reddit.com/GeometersOfHistory/comments/cyr1nq/gematria_of_161_and_322/
EDIT - again, next day (remembering that 'president' ~= 'count' ~= 'accountancy'):
I wrote here, a few days ago:
These are things we can imagine Alphabet Sages might desire to encode and honour - as much for a mnemonic purpose, as for teaching purposes, or for archiving [...] knowledge [...] or purely for the sake of esoterica itself (ie. wizard just likes math, or architecture, and thus honours math and arches, secretely in words using basic algebra and references to certain idioms and golden numbers. Wizard works for King, shows him tricks. King decrees new Bible edition, and new Dictionary version).
Today:
https://www.reddit.com/worldnews/comments/eemt1d/china_orders_christians_to_rewrite_the_bible_fo
China orders Christians to rewrite the Bible for the era of President Xi
China orders Christians to rewrite the Bible for the era of President Xi
  • "Right the Bible" = 369 primes
  • "The Alphabet Code" = 369 primes
  • "Ritual Code" = 1,666 squares
  • "Aright the Bible" = 1,666 squares
  • "The Bible: 1 Right" = 1,666 squares
EDIT - next day again (Christmas Eve) -- re: bullets (first edit above)
https://games.slashdot.org/story/19/12/23/2042253/how-do-bullets-work-in-video-games
How Do Bullets Work in Video Games?
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/12/lessons-from-scorching-hot-weirdo-planets/
Q&A(stronony) —
Lessons from scorching hot weirdo-planets
The first kind of exoplanet found, Hot Jupiters still perplex and captivate
from The Comte De Gabalis, discourse 1: https://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/cdg/cdg04.htm
He found me to be of a tractable, inquiring, and fearless disposition. A dash of melancholy is lacking in me, else I would make all, who are inclined to blame the Comte de GABALIS for having concealed nothing from me, confess that I was a not unfit subject for the Occult Sciences. One cannot make great progress in them, it is true, without melancholy; but the little that I possess in no wise disheartened him. You have, he told me a hundred times, Saturn in an angle, in his own house, and retrograde; some day you cannot. fail to be as melancholy as a Sage ought to be; for the wisest of all men, as we learn in the Cabala, had like you Jupiter in the Ascendant, nevertheless so powerful was the influence of his Saturn, though far weaker than yours, that one cannot find proof of his having laughed a single time in all his life. The Amateurs must, therefore, find fault with my Saturn and not with the Comte de GABALIS, if I prefer to divulge their secrets rather than to practise them.
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/12/optical-quantum-computer-goes-big-in-new-quest-for-quantum-supremacy/
Photons are (almost) supreme —
Why I dislike what “quantum supremacy” is doing to computing research
  • "Photonics" = 119 | 47 reduced (ie. Orthodox, Foundation, Master Plan)
  • "Photonics" = 968 trigonal
  • "A+ Photonics" = 969 trigona (ie. Matrix Code)
Q: Light particles?
"A: Bits of Light" = 393 primes (ie. Bits of a Light )
submitted by Orpherischt to GeometersOfHistory [link] [comments]

Dark Web Websites Links


https://mix.com/darkwebsites

https://www.pearltrees.com/darkwebsites

https://www.plurk.com/darkwebsites

https://slashdot.org/submission/9461224/dark-web-complete-drug-website-list

https://www.tumblr.com/blog/darkwebsites

https://profiles.wordpress.org/darkwebsites/

https://buydarkwebcreditcardnumber.blogspot.com/2019/04/best-way-to-buy-credit-card-numbers.html

https://www.deviantart.com/darkwebsites

https://myspace.com/darkweb1

https://medium.com/@darkwebids2/dark-web-complete-drug-website-list-ef542354d928


How to find dark web working websites?
It’s very hard to find out the working dark web websites list now because of fbi.
There is lot’s of dark web website is available but witch one to choose.

Dark web websites

First of all go to the tor browser website and download the tor browser for visit hidden onion websites.
When you initially start Tor program, it won’t lead you to a particular .onion districts. Tor essential gives a progressively secure (encoded) way to deal with get to the customary web. In order to go on an .onion site, you’ll have to acknowledge it exists and its zone. There are several ways to deal with find dynamic .onion goals. One of them is using a list of goals, like The Hidden Wiki.
Onion URL: http://zqktlwi4fecvo6ri.onion/wiki/index.php/Main\_Page
Here is the complete list of hidden wiki.

Blockchain for Bitcoins

If you have no idea how Bitcoin works or don’t have any crypto, don’t dither to skirt this one. In any case, for those interested, a champion among the most well known online Bitcoin wallets has an .onion URL (and even has a HTTPS affirmation for it).
How you can make use of this: If for no good reason you have to hold your Bitcoins anonymously, this is the spot for you.
Onion URL: https://blockchainbdgpzk.onion/
submitted by GullibleCharacter to u/GullibleCharacter [link] [comments]

Design, usability, and performance concerns with the redesign.

Performance

First there's the performance issues. My reasonably powerful laptop (last gen i7, 8 gb ram) grinds to a complete halt with half a dozen new reddit tabs open and nothing else. By comparison, I currently have seven old reddit tabs open, eight youtube tabs open, four pdf tabs, three wikipedia tabs, 13 random blogs open, a bunch of wiki articles, and a few misc. tabs. That whole mess uses 6-8 gigs of ram, so it's starting to get a little swappy. That's just chrome - I've got some libreoffice docs, Spotify, LyX, and even Eclipse open right now.
But new reddit? New reddit will happily consume 1/4 of my ram with a SINGLE TAB.
CPU is the same story. With current load, I'm totaling around 10% on average, spiking to 20%. A single new reddit tab will consume 10-15%. I'll repeat. A single reddit tab will use more CPU than my current ~40 tabs and five other programs. Is it mining Bitcoin? I wouldn't be surprised.

Layout

Comment section

Here's a screenshot of old reddit comments in a single tab. Note that the comments themselves stretch across 75-80% of the screen.
Here's a screenshot of new reddit comments in the modal on the exact same post. Notice how the comment section has shrunk to roughly 45% of my screen, and note that the new layout takes up about 15% more vertical space for the same content. It only gets more pronounced when actual discussion is happening (read: large posts), and it strikes me as poor design.
The entire overlay modal thing is ... not good. Clicking outside the box obliterates your place in the comments. Trying to scroll with your mouse if it's not over the overlay? Broken. Trying to scroll with arrow keys without clicking inside the overlay box again? Nope. Trying to not post a comment you started and then came back to? Good luck.
It doesn't get better when I manage to get to the comments in their own tab. New tab comments. Note that despite the fact that there's no front page below it, the size hasn't increased at all. Open two tabs and switch between them if you don't believe it.
To get a similar (though still smaller) number of comments into a much narrower space, they've resorted to cramping everything. Note that the indent between comment levels is much less pronounced, for example.
Let's see what else is worse in just these comment screenshots. We've gone from several different colors (dark green username, light green timestamp, bold point count, regular black comment text, and grey post options at the bottom, to "Everything is the exact same shade of grey now, except that the point count and timestamp are almost completely greyed out". That's not an improvement.
Speaking of the below the comment options, we've seemingly lost permalink, embed, source, and parent. I understand that source is an RES feature, but that doesn't make losing it any easier. The orders have also changed, but I'll grant the new order seems more logical.
Post collapsing is different. It's not better, but it's possible that I don't like it just because it's different. I do note you can't just click again to uncollapse if you collapse something by mistake, but that's minor.

Front page

New
Old
This is the frontpage in "classic" mode. The other modes (a) not reddit and (b) implemented even less well. (I won't even try tearing them apart, but the lack of a "comments" button in compact mode and the fact that I can see literally 1.5 posts at once in card mode would be a good place to start).
First, the number of posts has dropped from 9 to 7. Not a huge deal, but it does suggest the new design should feel more open, and it absolutely doesn't. The new design, despite the additional space you'd expect it to have gained by reducing the amount of content on screen, has also removed every post option besides the share and comments button. Everything else is behind a three dot menu, despite there being truly ample space. Post sorting is similarly hidden, electing for a drop down menu instead of a tabbed style interface. Sure, radio buttons are bad yadda yadda, but there's plenty of space and the new way is worse.
Similarly, the link to my profile, preferences, and logout are also hidden behind a menu. This menu does add a feedback form, but hiding three very common options behind a menu is inconvenient, and again, worse.
Putting everything behind menus might not even be so bad if it weren't for the fact that everything is clickable now. Any part of this box brings up the exact same floating window within a window, except the upvote/downvote arrows and the share button. Share brings up yet another menu, but with only two options it's a little baffling that you wouldn't just ... have two options to begin with? So to close a menu, I either have to go through with clicking inside the menu, or finding a space in the sidebar to the right, which compared to the old version is now inexplicably empty. Oh, and putting literally everything in boxes? Can you think of a single other website that puts the entire front page into boxes when a tiny bit of whitespace would do just as well? YouTube doesn't. Imgur barely does it, and it actually works for their layout. Slashdot doesn't. Fucking CNN doesn't even do that. But the new reddit design? Boxes and borders everywhere.
Worse yet, behavior is now inconsistent with how the entire rest of the internet works. There's no longer a reasonable way to click the ACTUAL LINK TO THE ACTUAL THING without first opening the stupid modal, loading all the comments into ram, and then clicking this tiny abbreviated link. See it? It's the tiny blue thing that ends in "/wiki/B..." when the rest of the link is simply "/wiki/Bill_Hader#Early_life". Why is it abbreviated? God knows. Why is there a tiny the title just being the link to the thing? Not even God knows that one. There's already a stereotype of people simply not reading the article. Now, people may not realize there's an article AT ALL.
Let me say that again. The links on the front page aren't even real links anymore. That's not poor design, that's obviously user hostile and designed to get us to spend more and more time on reddit, never leaving to the very links it's purporting to deliver to us.
Oh, and report, save, hide, and give gold are in a submenu now too. Sure.
The comments button does inconsistent things depending on how you click it now. Single click? Might as well not even have a comments button, because it does the exact same (stupid) thing it does if I click anywhere else in the box. Right or middle click? Now it's a real link to a comments page!
And the list just goes on, and on, and on. Search? The one that promises to search for community, post, or user? Right. Ads are disguised as real posts. Everything is javascript so you might as well give up on using your back button right now. /nfl still doesn't have functional flairs. CSS is gone (though its return keeps being promised). There are bugs basically everywhere, and no bug tracker. Profile pages are awful, and pushed onto the legacy site unless you change it in settings. All the buttons that haven't been simply removed are either entirely grayed out or giant touchable javascripty messes. Though it doesn't affect me personally, accessibility is an atrocity - keyboard browsing is effectively impossible. The thumbnail choices are just worse. Icons have been added where they're not necessary (reply, comments, share, etc).

Improvements

I do feel that the hamburger menu might be an improvement, especially if it started collapsed by default. I haven't used it enough to be sure, but it seems helpful and unobtrusive.
The floating top bar is simply a change. It loses some screen space for some additional features.
The fancy pants editor is probably better than markdown for new users, and maybe even for long-time users who only learned enough markdown to get by.
Image hosting is good. Video hosting has the potential to be good.
Some ideas of the redesign, like a card view, aren't even bad, just implemented ... poorly. But the classic mode is in my opinion worse than the original in almost every way, especially with RES.

Conclusion

I wrote a whole lot to say very little. I dislike the new design, even looking past the endless parade of bugs and hogging of system resources, and I don't want to use it. Please don't make me use it, and please fix the "bug" that undoes "use old reddit" every few days. Please don't implement a design that takes the worst parts of material design and implements them in a non-responsive way, while nevertheless using resources like you're testing one tab at a time on a supercomputer.
In short, please do better.
submitted by anonymous_rocketeer to redesign [link] [comments]

[ANN] Newest Bitcoin Fork: Bitcoin Luke (BTL)

tl;dr:

We will be forking off after block 497322. Reference client source and binaries will be published soon so that people have time to upgrade before the fork.

Features

Q&A

If you have any questions, ask God via TempleOS, ask luke-jr or post them in this thread.
submitted by asymptotically508 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Mass Surveillance News Collection from 2010

>>>>>>>>> Mass Surveillance
>>>>>>>>> Cognitive Infiltration and Mass Social Psychology Abuse
>>>>>>>> Smartphone Intrusion, Remote activation of Mics and Cameras
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Ways and Means; Technology and Law
>>>>>>> AT&T
>>>>>>>>>> Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Yahoo
>>>>>>>> Goals
>>>>>>>>>>> Lies, Coverups, Resource Misuse, and Danger of Tacit Complicity
>>>>>> Global Deep State Cooperation and Imitation
>>>>>>>>> Hardware, Rootkit, FIrmware Spyware
>>>>>>>> Blowback
>>>>>> Exoteric, Stated Goals of the Security State Have Failed
....CONTINUED IN COMMENTS
submitted by 911bodysnatchers322 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Second.

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is an American social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links. Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2017, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #7 most visited web-site in US and #22 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 5.5.7 2017 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and its mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high-quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text-only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Robin Williams,[43] Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[44] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Michael Moore, Spike Lee, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[45] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[46] Amanda Palmer,[47] Tim Ferriss,[48] Gordon Ramsay,[49] Peter Dinklage,[50] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[51] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[52] and Bernie Sanders.[53] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[54] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[55] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[56]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[57] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[58] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[59] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[60]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[61] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[62] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[63] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[64][65][66][67] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[68][69] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[70] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[70] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000–100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[70] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[71] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[72] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[73] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[74] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[75] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[76][77] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[78] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[79]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[80] David King,[81] and Mike Schiraldi.[82] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[83] and King[84] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[85] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[86] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[87]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[88] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[89] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[90] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[91]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[92] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[93] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[94][95]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[96] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[97] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[98] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[99] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[100] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[101]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[102] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[103] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[104]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[105] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[106] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[107] Andreddit,[108] F5, BaconReader,[109] Reddit Sync[110] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[111] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[112] and Reddit To Go!.[113] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[114] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[115] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[116] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[117] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[118] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[119] In 2013, Pewinternet stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[120] As of the end of 2016, Reddit is the only major social media platform that does not have a female majority user base.[121] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[122] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[123] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[124]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[125] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[126][127] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[128] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[129] cross-promoting[130] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[131] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[132] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[133] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[134][135][136] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[137] Several celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[138] and Snoop Dogg.[139] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[140] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[141] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[142] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[143][144][145] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[146][147] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[148] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[149] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[150] In response to the 2015 Nepal earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[151] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[152] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[153][154][155][156] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[157] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[158] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[159][160] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[161][162] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[163]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[164] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[165] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[166] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[167]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[168] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[169] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade satirist Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[170] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[171] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[172] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[173]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[174] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[175] Controversies See also: Controversial Reddit communities and Michael Brutsch
The website generally lets moderators on individual subreddits make editorial decisions about what content to allow, and has a history of permitting some subreddits dedicated to controversial content.[176] Many of the default pages are highly moderated, with the "science" subreddit banning climate change denialism,[177] and the "news" subreddit banning opinion pieces and columns.[178] Reddit has changed its site-wide editorial policies several times, sometimes in reaction to controversies.[179][180][181][182] Reddit has had a history of giving a platform to objectionable but legal content, and in 2011, news media covered the way that jailbait was being shared on the site before the site changed their policies to explicitly ban "suggestive or sexual content featuring minors".[183] Following some controversial incidents of Internet vigilantism, Reddit introduced a strict rule against the publication of non-public personally-identifying information via the site (colloquially known as doxxing). Those who break the rule are subject to a site-wide ban, and their posts and even entire communities may be removed for breaking the rule. 2010
On December 16, 2010, a redditor named Matt posted a link describing how he has donated a kidney, and included a JustGive link to encourage users to give donations to the American Cancer Society.[184] After an initially positive reaction, Reddit users began to become suspicious of Matt's intentions, and suggested that he was keeping the donations for himself. Users telephoned his home and he received death threats. Matt eventually proved that he was genuine by uploading his doctor's records.[185] 2011
On October 18, 2011, an IT manager submitted a post to the subreddit "gameswap" offering Redditors to trade one of 312 codes he had been given for the game Deus Ex: Human Revolution.[186] A group of users obtained his personal details, and began to blackmail him for the codes.[187] The Monday after uploading the post, he received 138 threatening phone calls both at home and at his job, and by the end of the day he had been fired.[188] 2013
Following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Reddit faced criticism after users wrongly identified a number of people as suspects.[189] Notable among misidentified bombing suspects was Sunil Tripathi, a student reported missing before the bombings took place. A body reported to be Sunil's was found in Providence River in Rhode Island on April 25, 2013, according to Rhode Island Health Department. The cause of death was not immediately known, but authorities said they did not suspect foul play.[190] The family later confirmed Tripathi's death was a result of suicide.[191] Reddit general manager Martin later issued an apology for this behavior, criticizing the "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation" that took place on the website.[192] The incident was later referenced in the season 5 episode of the CBS TV series The Good Wife titled "Whack-a-Mole,"[193] as well as The Newsroom.[194][195]
In late October 2013, the moderators of the "politics" subreddit banned a large group of websites. Many were left wing opinion websites, such as Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, Salon, Alternet, Rawstory, The Daily Kos, Truthout, Media Matters, and ThinkProgress as well as some popular progressive blog sites, such as Democratic Underground and Crooks and Liars. They also banned a number of right wing sites—Drudge Report, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, Dailypaul, Power Line, and Reason. Salon reported that "the section's moderators explained in a post on Tuesday, the goal is 'to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles.' The purge, the moderators explained, is also aimed at sites that provide lots of "bad journalism."[196] The December 2013 list of banned websites has been modified since late October, and sites with original content, such as Mother Jones and The Huffington Post, are allowed.[197] Moderators also banned RT, which moderators stated was due to vote manipulation and spam, though one moderator stated that he wanted RT banned because it is Kremlin backed.[198][199] 2014
In August 2014, photos from the 2014 celebrity photo hack were widely disseminated across the site.[200][201] A dedicated subreddit, "TheFappening," was created for this purpose,[202] and contained links to most if not all of the criminally obtained explicit images.[203][204][205][206][207] Some images of Liz Lee and McKayla Maroney from the leak were identified by redditors and outside commentators as child pornography because the photos were taken when the women were underage.[208] The subreddit was banned on September 6.[209] The scandal led to wider criticisms concerning the website's administration from The Verge and The Daily Dot.[210][211]
Also in August 2014, moderators and administrators censored a sizeable amount of content related to the GamerGate controversy; one thread in the "gaming" subreddit had almost 24,000 comments removed.[212] Multiple subreddits were deleted by administrators for voicing opinions on Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu and similarly important GamerGate controversy figures.[213] The subreddit "ZoeQuinnDiscussion" was banned for violating the Reddit rules.[214] Administrators defended this response when questioned, blaming 4chan for raiding threads and causing harm. This was debated by some redditors.[215] An anonymous subreddit moderator claims he was removed for leaking correspondence between himself and Zoe Quinn.[216] On December 18, 2014, Reddit took the unusual step of banning a subreddit, "SonyGOP," that was being used to distribute hacked Sony files.[217] 2015
After Ellen Pao became CEO, she was initially a target of criticism by users who objected to her lawsuit.[218] Later on June 10, 2015, Reddit shut down the 150,000-subscriber "fatpeoplehate" subreddit and four others citing issues related to harassment.[219] This move was seen as very controversial; some commenters said that the bans went too far, while others said that the bans did not go far enough.[220] One of the latter complaints concerned a subreddit that was "expressing support" for the perpetrator of the Charleston church shooting.[221] Responding to the accusations of "skewed enforcement", Reddit reaffirmed their commitment to free expression and stated that "There are some subreddits with very little viewership that get highlighted repeatedly for their content, but those are a tiny fraction of the content on the site."
On July 2, 2015, Reddit began experiencing a series of blackouts as moderators set popular subreddit communities to private, in an event dubbed "AMAgeddon," a portmanteau of AMA ("ask me anything") and Armageddon. This was done in protest of the recent firing of Victoria Taylor, an administrator who helped organize citizen-led interviews with famous people on the popular "Ask me Anything" subreddit. Organizers of the blackout also expressed resentment about the recent severance of the communication between Reddit and the moderators of subreddits.[222] The blackout intensified on July 3 when former community manager David Croach gave an AMA about being fired. Before deleting his posts, he stated that Ellen Pao dismissed him with one year of health coverage when he had cancer and did not recover quickly enough.[223][224] Following this, a Change.org petition to remove Pao as CEO of Reddit Inc. reached over 200,000 signatures.[225][226][227] Pao posted a response on July 3 as well as an extended version of it on July 6 in which she apologized for bad communication and not delivering on promises. She also apologized on behalf of the other administrators and noted that problems already existed over the past several years.[228][229][230][231] On July 10, Pao resigned as CEO and was replaced by former CEO and co-founder Steve Huffman.[94][232]
submitted by ViabilityTest to test [link] [comments]

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is a social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links.

Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2016, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #11 most visited web-site in US and #25 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[43] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[44] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[45] Amanda Palmer,[46] Tim Ferriss,[47] Gordon Ramsay,[48] Peter Dinklage,[49] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[50] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[51] and Bernie Sanders.[52] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[53] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[54] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[55]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[56] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[57] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[58] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[59]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[60] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[61] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[62] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[63][64][65][66] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[67][68] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[69] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[69] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000-100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[69] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[70] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[71] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[72] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[73] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[74] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[75][76] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[77] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[78]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[79] David King,[80] and Mike Schiraldi.[81] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[82] and King[83] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[84] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[85] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[86]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[87] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[88] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[89] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[90]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[91] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[92] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[93][94]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[95] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[96] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[97] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[98] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[99] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[100]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[101] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[102] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[103]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[104] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[105] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[106] Andreddit,[107] F5, BaconReader,[108] Reddit Sync[109] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[110] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[111] and Reddit To Go!.[112] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[113] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[114] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[115] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[116] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[117] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[118] In 2013 Pewinternet.org stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[119] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[120] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[121] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[122]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[123] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[124][125] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[126] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[127] cross-promoting[128] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[129] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[130] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[131] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[132][133][134] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[135] Several Celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[136] and Snoop Dogg.[137] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[138] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[139] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[140] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[141][142][143] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[144][145] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[146] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[147] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[148] In response to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[149] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[150] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[151][152][153][154] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[155] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[156] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[157][158] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[159][160] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[161]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[162] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[163] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[164] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[165]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[166] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[167] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[168] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[169] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[170] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[171]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[172] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[173]
See also
General
Crowdsourcing Internet culture PTT Bulletin Board System Social bookmarking Unidan Web 2.0 iconInternet portal 
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submitted by NERDSLAYER_Y2K to Negareddit [link] [comments]

TIL that May 22, 2010 someone paid 10.000 bitcoin for a pizza, which is now worth more than 17 million dollars

This is an automatic summary, original reduced by 82%.
February 6 Bitcoin Market established May 22 laszlo first to buy pizza with Bitcoins agreeing upon paying 10,000 BTC for ~$25 worth of pizza courtesy of jercos July 7 Bitcoin v0.3 released July 11 Bitcoin v0.3 release mentioned on slashdot , bringing a large influx of new bitcoin users.
September 18 puddinpop released source to their windows-based CUDA client under MIT license September 29 kermit discovered a microtransactions exploit which precipitated the Bitcoin v0.3.13 release October 01 First public OpenCL miner released October 04 Original Bitcoin History wiki page established on Bitcoin.org's wiki.
December 16 Bitcoin Pooled Mining, operated by slush, found its first block January 2 Tonal Bitcoin units standardized.
March 31 The first market for exchanging bitcoins to and from Brazilian Reals, Bitcoin Brazil, opens.
July 19 "Let it go on record that at 4:05pm CET , my manager Tadek was the first person in the world to receive [testnet] Bitcoins via NFC ;)" - Mike Hearn July 22 BitCoins Mobile, the first Bitcoin application for iPad was released by Intervex Digital.
August 20 First Bitcoin Conference and World Expo held, in NYC. August 23 P2Pool, the first P2P decentralized pool, mines its first Bitcoin mainnet block.
Summary Source | FAQ | Theory | Feedback | Top five keywords: Bitcoin#1 first#2 exchange#3 MtGox#4 block#5
Post found in /todayilearned.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

Hey #OccupyWallSt - #subverse is a brand for subversives like you. I'll pay you Bitcoins to advertise it on your signs.

TL;DR: Write #subverse legibly on a protest sign, take a photo of you holding the sign in NYC, post it here alongside a Bitcoin address, receive Bitcoins.

Hi guys. Back in January, someone offhandedly mentioned flight N987SA. I googled that, which led to other CIA conspiracies, which led to all kinds of redpills.
Over time, I realized that there were major problems with the status quo. But it was really hard to find knowledgable people and good information. Learning how Monsanto screws small farmers, learning from John Taylor Gatto's work about America's sabotaged state school system, learning what the fuck a lobbyist is... this took me months of unemployed googling. Most people don't have that much time to educate themselves, so they don't understand the fundamental problems #OccupyWallSt wants to solve.
I was confused that all of this information was so spread out. Why wasn't there a Digg, Slashdot, or Reddit for all of this subversive stuff?
I'd like to set up a site to sort and index and filter all this content, but I'm spending too much time being unemployed and homeless to code that yet. [1] What I did do was define a brand that represents our drive to fix the world: Subverse.
The revolution isn't televised. It's entirely up to us to teach everyone else what's going on and how to change it. "Subverse" is an awesome name with ideal connotations - there is a whole world of underground intel that's dangerous to the Powers That Be if it becomes public knowledge.
So, I have a few Bitcoins left over from my #BitcoinRoadtrip. I really believe that this context is the final thing we need for the 99% to unify, so I'm offering to pay bitcoins for your help. Think of it yourself as a street team advertising the global revolution. Bounties will be proportional to the awesomeness of your sign. Here's a couple logos I came up with.
btw, I'm in Portland OR but I've been following #OccupyWallSt with rapt attention. I'm maintaining a Twitter list of users who are on the ground. Please tell me of new accounts to add!
[1] Everyone on Reddit gets an equal vote, including shill accounts and other Meanies. The key is to track reputation of each user and weed out these disreputable. Imagine Ebay feedback that works on multiple sites: when you sell a guitar, or buy bitcoins on an exchange, or use a rideshare network, all these interactions affect your reputation. Now imagine a wiki full of subversive stuff where you can opt to only view edits by users you trust.
submitted by therealPlato to occupywallstreet [link] [comments]

Daily: WTF is Bitcoin Diamond / Altcoins Attack! BITCOIN HACKING hack bitcoin free software 2020 Bitcoin Hack Private key on PC 2020 How Low Will Bitcoin Go?

Merely weeks after it was announced that Bitcoin was splitting into two separate entities, the initial version of bitcoin and it's new "bitcoin cash," the network is adding a third version, according to a report. From the article: On Wednesday, a group of bitcoiners scheduled yet another split for the network in November, which would create a third version of bitcoin. Malicious cryptocurrency miners took control of Bitcoin Gold's blockchain recently to double-spend $72,000 worth of BTG.The Next Web reports: Bad actors assumed a majority of the network's processing power (hash rate) to re-organize the blockchain twice between Thursday and Friday last week: the first netted attackers 1,900 BTG ($19,000), and the second roughly 5,267 BTG ($53,000). The sender in the transaction specifies the transaction fee. The wiki [bitcoin.it] has more info. "the person attempting to make a transaction can include any fee or none at all in the transaction. On the other hand, nobody mining new bitcoins necessarily needs to accept the transactions and include them in the new block being created. An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The amount of energy required to "mine" one dollar's worth of bitcoin is more than twice that required to mine the same value of copper, gold or platinum, according to a new paper, suggesting that the virtual work that underpins bitcoin, ethereum and similar projects is more similar to real mining than anyone intended. Since at least 2011, WikiLeaks has allowed supporters to send bitcoin donations. As noted by James Ball, a journalist and former WikiLeaks staffer, whoever is in control of this address -- presumably WikiLeaks -- moved around 3,000 bitcoin, worth $800 each, into a series of other accounts on one day in December 2013.

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Daily: WTF is Bitcoin Diamond / Altcoins Attack!

Bitcoin Last Time This Happened 50%+ Move Occurred! April 2020 Price Prediction & News Analysis - Duration: 41:16. Krown's Crypto Cave 5,157 views. New #Cryptotab script free bitcoins how to earn free bitcoins how to earn bitcoins cryptotab hack bitsler script bitcoin generator how to get bitcoins bitcoin miner 2020 how to mine bitcoins cryptotab ... Bitcoin Diamond forked yesterday, giving everyone who was holding Bitcoin at the time 10 BCD for each BTC. Altcoins are on a major rally today 1:00 Market Analysis 4:02 Bitcoin Diamond? 6:52 ... #slashdot bitcoin #bitcoin #buy bitcoins #buy bitcoin #bitcoin buy #bitcoin miner 2020 #bitcoin miner 2020 generator #bitcoin miner 2020 ultimate - v5.1.1 #bitcoin miner 2020 apk #mine bitcoin 2020 After bitcoin's dramatic drop this month, what are the likely lower targets - and how do we calculate them? We explain. For more on bitcoin visit: https://ww...